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Medication Treatments

HHS is publishing new guidelines that will expand access to medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder by exempting physicians from certain certification requirements necessary for prescribing buprenorphine.
Results of a clinical trial published by NIH on Wednesday showed that a combination of two medications—injectable naltrexone and oral bupropion—were safe and effective in the treatment of adults with moderate or severe methamphetamine use disorder.
Results of a NIDA-supported pilot study released on Monday showed that collaboration between physicians and pharmacists could lead to improved medication adherence among patients being treated for opioid use disorder.
With the lethality, availability and use of stimulants all greatly increasing in the U.S. in recent years and the COVID-19 pandemic complicating the treatment landscape for patients and practitioners alike, it’s critical for providers to weather the storm, Deni Carise, PhD, chief science officer for Recovery Centers of America, told Cocaine, Meth & Stimulant Summit attendees in a Saturday session.
The Indiana University School of Medicine has received a $12.3 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for a two-stage research project to study the use of tezampanel to treat opioid withdrawal syndrome, as well as other addictions and mental illnesses.
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