Skip to main content
Psych Congress  

Comparison of treatment adherence among new-start patients on lurasidone vs. other atypical antipsychotics: Results from a multi-state Medicaid population among adults with schizophrenia

Authors  
Mariam Hassan, PhD. Sally Wade, MPH. Nicole Meyer, MA. Krithika Rajagopalan, PhD. Andrei Pikalov, MD. Antony Loebel, MD.
Sponsor  
Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Objective: 
Adherence to antipsychotic treatment among schizophrenia patients is a predictor of relapse, hospitalizations, and consequently higher costs. This study compares treatment adherence with lurasidone vs. other atypical antipsychotics during the first 6 months on therapy in Medicaid-insured adults with schizophrenia.
Methods:
Retrospective study of health insurance claims from multi-state Medicaid databases for schizophrenia patients, aged 18–64, initiating monotherapy with lurasidone, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine XR, quetiapine IR or risperidone between 10/1/2010-9/30/2011. Adherence over 6-months post-initiation evaluated using three measures: length of continuous (no therapy gaps ≥ 45 days) therapy, medication possession ratio (MPR), and discontinuation (therapy gap of ≥ 45 days) rate using pair-wise comparisons (chi-square and paired t-tests).
Results:
Qualifying patients were allocated to the following cohorts: lurasidone (n=146), aripiprazole (n=123), olanzapine (n=159), quetiapine XR (n=278), quetiapine IR (n=228) and risperidone (n=568). Mean length of continuous therapy (days) was significantly longer for lurasidone patients (mean[SD]) (107.1 [63.8]) compared to aripiprazole (84.8 [55.9]), olanzapine (87.2 [61.5]), quetiapine XR (82.2 [59.6]), quetiapine IR (82.6 [59.1]) and risperidone (79.4 [59.1]) (p<0.001). Mean MPR (mean[SD]) for lurasidone (0.60 [0.35]) was significantly higher compared to aripiprazole (0.47 [0.31]), olanzapine (0.48 [0.34]), quetiapine XR (0.46 [0.33]), quetiapine IR (0.46 [0.33]), and risperidone (0.44 [0.33]) (p<0.05). Lurasidone patients had lower treatment discontinuation rates (49%) compared to aripiprazole (64%), olanzapine (62%), quetiapine XR (63%), quetiapine IR (63%), and risperidone (66%) (p<0.05).
Conclusions:
This analysis of adult Medicaid-insured patients with schizophrenia demonstrated better adherence for lurasidone compared to aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine XR, quetiapine IR, and risperidone.

Back to Top